Advertisement

Preventing Foodborne Infection in Pregnant Women and Infants

      Identify microorganisms most commonly associated with foodborne illness in pregnant women and infants.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment
      AWHONN Member Login
      AWHONN Members, full access to the journal is a member benefit. Use your society credentials to access all journal content and features
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        Preventing foodborne illness: Escherichia coli O157: H7.
        (Retrieved May 11, 2007, from)
        • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        Hepatitis e virus.
        (Retrieved January 4, 2007, from)
        • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        Escherichia coli O157:H7.
        (Retrieved July 2, 2007, from)
        • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        Ongoing multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections associated with consumption of fresh spinach—United States, September 2006.
        Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2006; 55: 1-2
        • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        Questions and answers: Sickness caused by E. coli.
        (Retrieved January 25, 2007, from)
        • Cliver D.O.
        Foodborne diseases.
        Academic Press, 1990
        • Cox N.
        • Hinkle R.
        Infant botulism.
        American Family Physician. 2002; 65: 1388-1392
        • Dean J.
        • Kendall P.
        Food safety during pregnancy.
        (Retrieved January 5, 2007, from)
        • Food and Drug Administration
        Foodborne pathogenic microorganisms and natural toxins handbook: Clostridium botulinum.
        (Retrieved January 5, 2007, from)
        • Food and Drug Administration
        Foodborne pathogenic microorganisms and natural toxins handbook: Listeria monocytogenes.
        (Retrieved January 2, 2007, from)
        • Food and Drug Administration
        Food safety for moms-to-be (educator’s resource guide).
        (Retrieved November 10, 2007, from)
        • Institute of Food Technologists
        Bacteria associated with foodborne diseases: Scientific status summary.
        Food Technology. 2004; 58: 69-78
        • Lynch M.
        • Painter J.
        • Woodruff R.
        • Braden C.
        Surveillance for foodborne-disease outbreak—United States, 1998–2002.
        Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2006; 55: 1-34
        • March of Dimes
        Foodborne risks in pregnancy.
        (Retrieved November 10, 2007, from)
        • Moos M.K.
        Listeriosis: How nurses can prevent the preventable.
        AWHONN Lifelines. 2006; 10: 498-501
        • Scarlatos A.
        • Welt B.A.
        • Cooper B.Y.
        • Archer D.
        • DeMarse T.
        • Chau K.V.
        Methods of detecting botulinum toxin with applicability to screening foods against biological terrorist attacks.
        Journal of Food Science. 2005; 70: 121-130
        • Schwarz R.H.
        Pregnancy infections.
        (Retrieved January 4, 2007, from)
        • World Health Organization
        Executive summary.
        (Retrieved May, 11, 2007, from)
        • World Health Organization
        Hepatitis E.
        (Retrieved January 4, 2007, from)
        • World Health Organization
        Zoonotic infections.
        (Retrieved May 11, 2007, from)

      Biography

      Michael C. Bazaco, MS, is a doctoral student in public health; Susan A. Albrecht, PhD, RN, FAAN, is associate professor and associate dean of the School of Nursing; Angela M. Malek, MPH, is a doctoral student in public health; all authors are at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. The authors report no conflicts of interest or financial relationships relevant to this article.